By Peter Orsi and Christopher Sherman, The Associated Press

As Washington and Mexico City both took victory laps over a deal that headed off threatened tariffs on Mexican imports, it remained to be seen how effective it may be and migration experts raised concerns over what it could mean for people fleeing poverty and violence in Central America.

Other than a vague reiteration of a joint commitment to promote development, security and growth in Central America, the agreement focuses almost exclusively on enforcement and says little about the root causes driving the surge in migrants seen in recent months.

The deployment of 6,000 National Guard troops appears to be the key commitment in what was described as “unprecedented steps” by Mexico to ramp up enforcement, though Mexican Interior Secretary Olga Sánchez Cordero said that had already been planned and was not a result of external pressure.

Mexico was already increasing enforcement such as detentions, deportations and checkpoints.

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Mexico-U.S. Tariff Deal: Questions and Concerns for Migration